Fret Saw build

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routout
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Fret Saw build

Post by routout » Sun Sep 18, 2016 1:12 pm

Well I got sick of my old fret saw jig and thought I would get my ass in gear and build an attachment for the CNC .I looked into gear boxes of the right angled type all I could find was a max input speed of 3,000 RPM the spindle I have needs about 5-6 k to have torque so I have had this old Tachi 4 inch angle grinder that I used now and then because the motor was kind of dying what the hey I thought .

These have a 3.5 to 1 ratio also the motors on these things fly so no issue with speed at the cutter has a locking button at the back (bonus )works like a charm and the other thing I can use it for is making kurfed lining they do rattle a little but there is no runout at the blade fun for all.cheers John.
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John ,of way too many things to do.

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demonx
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Re: Fret Saw build

Post by demonx » Mon Sep 19, 2016 11:08 am

Looks great, only criticism I would have is that unless you have a tool changer, it'd take you longer to set this up that it would than to have a dedicated slotting saw which is always setup and ready to go.

routout
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Re: Fret Saw build

Post by routout » Mon Sep 19, 2016 3:23 pm

I was thinking the same thing when I built it ,here's the trick once I set the datum I can do the inlay dots slots or fancy designs then slip the tool form the collet slide the saw head in load the code 4 screws to lock it up and then the fret slots all done in around 10 min I could throw on a compound radius while I'm there I guess :) .
John ,of way too many things to do.

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demonx
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Re: Fret Saw build

Post by demonx » Tue Sep 20, 2016 7:55 am

routout wrote:....fret slots all done in around 10 min I could throw on a compound radius while I'm there I guess :) .
Don't think of my comments as being negative, as I use CNC and I'm very interested in a quick, accurate fretting option, so think of the as constructive criticism.

On my current manual fretting setup (a dedicated radial arm saw with a slot locating jig mounted), I could fret maybe four or five boards in the ten minutes it took you to put that blade into your CNC, which brings me back to the previous tool changer comment. On the saw I pull it forward cutting one slot, move the template across and cut a second slot as the board goes back, so you're cutting a slot every three or four seconds if you're pacing yourself.

I guess if you're only building a guitar every now and then, and you want to incorporate CNC, then what you've done is awesome.

I myself want to cut slots on my CNC, I just have not found a way that will work in with the rest of my system yet other than a tiny end I'll which is prone to break and will take way too long. I like where you're going with this saw, I've seen similar tools in factories, I just hate wasting time on setting up tools.

A lot of people are using lasers for their slots these days as it's quick and accurate. I have bugger all knowledge at the moment about lasers.

routout
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Re: Fret Saw build

Post by routout » Tue Sep 20, 2016 8:08 am

You get me wrong once again I don't take any comment as criticism all comments are welcome good bad or indifferent ,I understand where you are coming from I without going into long winded madness .Was simply saying that I can do an Intricate inlay both parts shell and pocket then a quick change as I already have the datum a minute the blade is in and 10 min walk away come back and the fret slots are done ,so complete fret boards done in 15 min I guess I could Include the compound radius as well. :D
John ,of way too many things to do.

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demonx
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Re: Fret Saw build

Post by demonx » Tue Sep 20, 2016 8:22 am

I didn't read it that way, I was just making it clear I think it's a great idea, just has limitations. If you're only doing a guitar every now and then, the thing is brilliant!

Max Taylor

Re: Fret Saw build

Post by Max Taylor » Mon Nov 07, 2016 11:13 am

Regardless of the time it takes to cut the fret slots or the procedure used, that time when considered in the overall time put into the creation of a precision instrument the ‘time’ pales in relation to the whole overall.

John’s CNC approach obviously holds accuracy to the max plus it would also be easy enough to place maybe 5 fretboards side by side and cut each fret location across all 5 at one time thereby averaging time per board way way down.

About 6 months ago my better half and I were in San Diego (actually El Cajon, California) and decided to take the free factory 1 1/2 hour tour offered by “Taylor Guitars” (yes they stoled my name). Even though it is a factory build for all their guitars it is really amazing how almost every part of their guitars are produced via CNC technology. In one operation alone a CNC machine was carving out five necks at one time. All frets are put in by hand though. All tops and backs are cut out with lasers set up for each model. All back braces are glued and placed into position by hand using a template then vacuum clamped. Sides are bent on heated aluminium forms, etc. The finished guitars are sprayed with Nitrocellulose Lacquer by a pair of robotic arms, one which rotates the guitar body and the other that moves all around it and does the spraying and does it all in about a minute or less.

Almost nothing is made by hand anymore but what is people in the know are willing to pay for it. The “Lockheed Super Constellation” was designed by hand by engineers drawing on paper. A Boeing 747-800 is completely designed with CAD, yet the sound of a ball bouncing off of either one probably sounds about the same but they both fly well. Ask Breitling and talk about timeless design.

https://www.breitling.com/en/airtime/su ... tellation/

Advantage to CNC is the ease of which one can easily use the same equipment and allow the CAD side to make adjustments for any scale length without the need for custom special templates, yet still do almost thing you want with one machine.

Yet, either way works and it is just a matter of taking advantage of the equipment one may have available to them. I’ll bet that if “Stradivarius” were alive today he would probably take advantage of todays technology if he could. Using CNC to carve out the head scroll on a violin would be preferable to doing it by hand if one had access to that technology. Simply scale it up for a Viola, Cello and Bass. All is good.

–Max

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